Volvo Energy Efficient Vehicle

The Volvo Group is running a bi-lateral project in the US and Sweden with a common goal of significantly improving the freight-moving efficiency of future trucks and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

The objectives are to improve freight efficiency by 50 percent, measured in ton-kilometer per liter, compared with 2009 truck models, and to increase the efficiency of the engine by 20 percent.

The objectives are to improve freight efficiency by 50 percent and to increase the efficiency of the engine by 20 percent
The five-year program focuses on the complete vehicle – the truck and the trailer – and Volvo Group researchers, together with some key suppliers, are looking at many innovative solutions to meet the ­program’s aggressive targets. With constant load this means the fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced by 33 percent. The team will also demonstrate an engine concept capable of reaching 55 percent brake thermal efficiency.

The final deliverables for the project will be two concept trucks, one in the US and one in Sweden, for evaluation and demonstration of the new technologies. While the selection of technologies for each concept truck will ensure that the unique demands of each market are met, common technologies will be used when possible.
 After only two years into this program, the Super Truck team has already demonstrated freight efficiency improvements for trucks by over 35 percent
For the US part of the project, called Super Truck, the Volvo Group is closely working with the US Department of Energy and the National Energy & Technology Laboratory. The partners include Penn State University, Grote and Freight Wing. After only two years into this program, the Super Truck team has already demonstrated freight ­efficiency improvements for trucks by over 35 percent.

The Swedish part of the project is completed in cooperation with the Swedish Energy Agency (Energimyndigheten) within the ­Strategic Vehicle Research and Innovation (Fordonsstrategisk Forskning och Innovation, FFI) and is done in partnership with Lund ­University. Several significant improvements have already been identified and verified in simulations and in engine test cells.